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Dec 03. Ellen Weinstein on Illustration

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The Brown Institute is delighted to welcome back Ellen Weinstein, a well-known illustrator whose work has appeared in outlets like The New York Times, The Village Voice, Nautilus and The New Republic, to name just a few. On Friday, December 2, Weinstein led a panel on illustration and journalism. Panelists included Andrew Horton, the Creative Director of the Village Voice; Alissa Levin, founder and principal of Point Five; and Victor Juhasz, a prolific political caricaturist. While our discussion was ostensibly about the ways in which illustrators craft stories, we kept returning to the national election.

How do you make sense of it and how do you respond? What should illustrators, and artists in general, be doing? The panel returned to this question in one way or another, whether it was through overtly political satire or more quiet expressions of uncertainty. With a mix of art directors and illustrators on the panel, we started to get a sense of how illustration interacts with the editorial process -- how work is commissioned, how ideas develop and how judgements are made about the appropriateness of images.

In the end, we saw the power of the medium, both as its own form of expression, as well as through its ability to elevate journalism.

Some details. Andrew Horton oversaw the design of The Village Voice covers during the election cycle, creating illustrations about Clinton being "her own worst enemy," the Republican National Convention, and, just a week before the election, the impact of Trump's candidacy on the U.S. Horton opened his process, showing works in various stages before publication and describing when drawings had gone "too far." Alissa Levin and her company Point Five have worked with publications like Harpers, Nautilus, and even our own Columbia Journalism Review. Levin discussed a range of projects she's supervised and her different strategies for developing illustrations. Victor Juhasz presented sketches during his time embedded as a "combat artist" with a MEDEVAC unit in Kandahar, Afghanistan. These were powerful works, often drawn during rescue missions. We also saw a fair number of Juhasz's political satire pieces that commented, sharply, on moments during the election cycle.  

Then, Saturday, Weinstein led a packed house of journalism students through a set of exercises, prompts for drawing. First, fast sketching around big words - "climate," "identity," "bullying," and so on. Then, we paired off and took turns as editor and illustrator, creating an image for two of three articles Weinstein provided. The energy around this task was amazing. Weinstein is a true professional and her critique ranges from the practical to the profound. We closed the day with students considering their own projects and how they could add illustration. Weinstein's advice was to distill the story into one sentence -- that process of reduction leads to an effective back and forth with visual ideas. We closed with a detailed critique from Weinstein, again insightful and compelling. 

This was the second year we have featured illustration in the Transparency Series, and there will certainly be a third! Thank you, Ellen, for an incredible couple of days.

Nov 30. Brown Welcomes BBC News to Stanford

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The Brown Institute is excited to host BBC News Executives Gavin Allen, Morwen Williams, Trushar Barot and Ros Atkins to campus this week. On Tuesday, the BBC team met with reporters and editors at The Stanford Daily for a discussion on the future of the digital newsroom. In addition to meeting with Brown Magic grantees, students and faculty, the BBC News team will spend the week in residence with the Brown Institute at Stanford, working on new video capture and editing software. 

Nov 29. Fall Speaker Series at Stanford, pondering the locus of media

In November, Brown@Stanford hosted the first two speakers in its year-long series that examines how innovation is alterating the face of public media and platforms. 

On November 1, Internet Archive's Founder and Director, Brewster Kahle, in a talk entitled "Brewster Kahle locks the web open," balanced a historical look at the web with an open forum on discussing how in its third decade it could be improved upon, both in terms of access and structure, through decentralization.  The decentralized web "lives everywhere and nowhere," Mr. Kahle said, adding, "it is possible to do this." Tools that were not available to the early developers make this process possible. The talk went on to outline some of the challenges and questions involved in making it happen. 

Then, on November 17, Bay Area Journalist Frances Dinkelspiel introduced the Stanford crowd to Berkeleyside, an innovative approach to local news reporting and ownership. Berkeleyside seeks to report local, and is the first media agency using a Direct Public Offering to let members of its community and readership become vested in the endeavor. Citing some of the reasons why local news coverage has declined over the last few years across the industry, she then outlined why this coverage is still vital to the communities that it serves, and how Berkeleyside is addressing these needs using the new media platforms and tools and engaging directly with their readership.

The Speaker Series will continue in the winter quarter with appearance by Marty Barron and Daniel Alarcon. Dates and details will be announced once formalized. If you'd like to be notified, please join our mail list by clicking here.

Brown Visiting Professor Greg Niemeyer will also present a talk on the Stanford campus on December 9 entitled "State Change: What media will communicate climate change?" Further details can be found here.

Nov 25. Transparency Series on Illustration - Dec 2 & 3

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Illustration is the next topic in our Transparency Series! Journalistic outlets like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Atlantic and Nautilus use illustration as an important part of their content. Word and image work together to produce beautifully told stories, drawing readers in. Metaphor, humor and empathy are powerful visual tools to engage and delight. As usual, our events take place in two parts.

Friday, December 2nd from 5-6pm Ellen Weinstein will lead a panel discussion that is open to the public with Andrew Horton, Alissa Levin, and Victor Juhasz on illustration as it relates to journalism. Andrew Horton is the Creative Director of the Village Voice. He has previously led the art departments of Business Week, Billboard and Advertising Age, and he has worked for magazines such as New York, Newsweek, and Rolling Stone. Alissa Levin is founder and principal of Point Five, a New York City-based design studio specializing in work with an educational or cultural focus. Victor Juhasz has illustrated for many major magazines, newspapers, book publishers, advertising agencies, both national and international. In August, 2011, he embedded with the 1-52nd Arctic Thunder Dustoff (helicopter medical evacuation) in Kandahar, Afghanistan, his artwork and writing appearing in GQ online.

Saturday, December 3rd from 10am-5pm Ellen Weinstein will lead our hands-on workshop, an event with limited seats. Weinstein, a  world-renowned illustrator and frequent contributor to many publications, will introduce basic visual thinking skills that will lead you through visualizing a story from text. How do you employ visual metaphors without being cliché? How do you create visual empathy with a subject? When is humor appropriate? During the day, we will create, discuss and think about word and image, not as separate entities but as halves of a whole.

Weinstein is a graduate of Pratt Institute and is an instructor at the Rhode Island School of Design. She has received awards from American Illustration, Society of Illustrators, Communication Arts Illustration Annual, Print’s Regional Design Annual, Society of Publication Designers, Society of News Designers and the Art Directors Club. Weinstein exhibits her work in local New York galleries as well as galleries in the US and Italy. You can see her work at www.ellenweinstein.com

Registration for this event is now open at brwn.co/tx . Make sure you receive an email confirmation!

We hope you enjoy this very special event.

Nov 22. Brown Brings Journalism Collaboration to MozFest

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Elections, hacks, leaks and a potentially compromised position of net neutrality mean that digital rights will be a major battleground of the next decade, and maybe decades to come. As government policies lag behind technological realities, many people and organizations are stepping in to have the difficult conversations necessary to establish new rules for a sustainable and equitable web. Many experts feel that open technologies are the only way to push innovation and storytelling forward, and say that a free and open web is critical for the free flow of information and to sustain a healthy democracy.

The Brown Institute's Allison McCartney and David Riordan recently travelled to the annual Mozilla Festival October 28-30 in London to meet with organizations like Mozilla and the Internet Archive, both of which are dedicated to promoting these ideas. There, we ran a workshop that explored ways to collaborate at the edges of journalism, asking the question: How can journalists and their organizations better establish and foster relationships with non-journalistic entities?

That mission is becoming ever more important with the rise of "fake news" and as news organizations increasingly focus on their digital operations, at the expense of traditional means of circulation and profit. Meanwhile, would-be partners like tech companies, universities and non-profits need news organizations to provide information and better tell the stories of what they do. None of this is possible without the support of ethical actors of all sorts who have the good faith of the public in mind.

The topic garnered a lot of interest and thoughtful discussion among the approximately 50 participants, most of whom were not from journalism.

Read more about the discussion, and the Brown Institute tips for on how to  successfully establish cross-industry collaborations at the session’s Etherpad.

Nov 04. Transparency Series: Virtual Reality

The next Transparency Series event is on the use of Virtual Reality (VR) in journalism. With the recent explosion of VR – specifically 360-degree video– journalistic outlets are hungry for quality documentary content for immersive platforms. While immersive media experiences have become increasingly prevalent in the gaming and entertainment industries, we are only beginning to explore them within the context of documentary photography and journalism. How can media makers use immersion as a tool to engage communities and forward social change? How does immersing your viewer in content change the nature of the story you are telling? And how does this mode of experiencing a story change how journalists approach the planning, creation, and distribution of stories?

As usual, this event is broken into two parts.

The first part, on Friday November 18 at 5pm, is a talk by Raney Aronson-Rath. Aronson-Rath leads FRONTLINE, PBS' flagship investigative journalism series. She has been internationally recognized for her work to expand FRONTLINE’s reporting capacity, reimagine the documentary form across multiple platforms, and report and tell stories that matter in new, creative ways. She has overseen the production of several VR documentaries including “Return to Chernobyl,” “On the Brink of Famine,” and “Ebola Outbreak." 

The second part, on Saturday November 19, is a day-long, hands-on workshop led by Marcelle Hopkins, the Executive Producer for 360 News at The New York Times, and Matt MacVey from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. The VR workshop will take students who have little to no background in virtual reality and introduce them to the fundamentals of working in the medium. The workshop will start with a screening of VR films and quickly move outdoors to film. As with all the events in the Transparency Series, this will be a mix of theory and practice. 

Registration for the hands-on workshop will at 5pm November 4. The sign-up form will be posted at http://brwn.co/tx. Below are the bios for our presenters. This should be a great event!

Raney Aronson-Rath leads FRONTLINE, PBS’ flagship investigative journalism series. She has been internationally recognized for her work to expand FRONTLINE’s reporting capacity, reimagine the documentary form across multiple platforms, and report and tell stories that matter in new, creative ways. Under Aronson-Rath’s leadership, FRONTLINE has won every major award in broadcast journalism, earned new funding to expand its investigative capacity and dramatically expanded its digital footprint. Under Aronson-Rath, FRONTLINE has produced several groundbreaking documentaries in VR — “Return to Chernobyl,” “On the Brink of Famine,” and “Ebola Outbreak” — and they will expand their exploration of virtual reality in journalism with a large grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Prior to FRONTLINE, Aronson-Rath worked at ABC News, The Wall Street Journal, and MSNBC. She earned her bachelor’s degree in South Asian studies and history from the University of Wisconsin, and received her master’s from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Marcelle Hopkins is the Executive Producer for 360 News at The New York Times. Before joining The Times, she produced and directed virtual reality documentaries for FRONTLINE and Emblematic Group. In the past two years, she has received a reporting fellowship from the International Women's Media Foundation, a Magic Grant from the Brown Institute for Media Innovation, a Ford Foundation JustFilms fellowship at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, and a United Nations Correspondents Association award. She spent seven years at Al Jazeera's UN bureau, where she produced TV news packages, interviews, features and documentaries.

Matt MacVey is developing immersive journalism curriculum and workshops at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. Matt wrote a report about immersive media for the NYC Media Lab and worked on interactive stories in the exhibitions department at the American Museum of Natural History.

Oct 24. Stanford Daily's take on the Media Innovation Showcase (video)

Stanford's campus newspaper, The Stanford Daily, gave a run down of the projects recently presented at the the Brown Media Innovation Showcase in their article, "Brown Institute showcase features tour guide drones, defense contract database." Read their report here, or if you'd like to see the flash presenations from the night, the video is now posted (or watch it below).

 

Oct 21. JSK Fellowship Program - New “Teams and Themes” Concept

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As they open applications for their next year of fellows, our colleagues at the JSK Journalism Fellowship program at Stanford are launching a new approach to create deeper collaborations among fellows and test innovative ideas for addressing the biggest challenges facing journalism.

Oct 18. Introducing the 2016-2017 Base Camps

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The Brown Institute for Media Innovation at the Columbia Journalism School and the School of Engineering at Stanford University invite you to apply to the Media Innovation Base Camps taking place on November 12-13, 2016 at Columbia University in New York City, and on January 14-15, 2017 at Stanford University in Palo Alto. The Media Innovation Base Camp offers a great starting point for entrepreneurial students who want to explore the interplay between story and technology, creating new ways to inform and delight

Are you passionate about the role that emerging technologies can play in the future of storytelling and journalism? Do you have a story taht can only be told using technology outside the scope of traditional media? Base Camp is for you!

For each Base Camp, we will assemble a cohort of 12-15 students from each campus. In November, engineering students from Stanford will travel to New York to work with journalism students at Columbia, and in January we flip, sending Columbia students to the Bay Area. (All expenses are paid, of course!) Each cohort, a mix of engineers and journalists, will learn about interdisciplinary collaboration, exploring new forms of storytelling.

Our goal at Base Camp is to introduce students to a design process customized for journalistic innovation, with a potential byproduct being a new idea that might lead to a one-year “Magic Grant” project — you can read about the Brown Institute's Magic Grant program here. Brown Institute Fellows, industry experts, and faculty will be on hand to provide feedback, guidance, and support. You don’t need to have a fleshed-out idea to apply for these events — the Base Camp is designed to give you space to develop your ideas, collaboratively.

Apply at brown.submittable.com.

Oct 18. Cannabis Wire in Nieman Reports

Magic Grantees Alyson Martin and Nushin Rashidian are featured on the NiemanReports website with a piece entitled "Why Cannabis Coverage Needs to be a Serious Beat." During their time with Brown, Martin and Rashidian created Cannabis Wire, a single-subject news site that "provides smart coverage of the global cannabis industry through original, in-depth nonpartisan reporting and analysis." Their article for Nieman presents the complexity of reporting on the medical, legal and economic dimensions of cannabis. They write:

"At a time when roughly 200 million Americans live in a state with some form of legalized cannabis, the need for in-depth reporting about the drug is urgent. Patients, doctors, researchers, regulators, recreational consumers, and industry members are arguing over whether to focus on the plant’s pharmaceutical potential or to treat cannabis like alcohol... Many journalists find themselves in new or unfamiliar roles, sometimes taking positions, sometimes becoming part of the story."

Established in 2012, the Institute is a collaboration between Columbia and Stanford Universities. Our mission is simple: Sponsor thinking, building and speculating on how stories are discovered and told in a networked, digitized world.
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